Featured Artist Dennis Ruble

The three dimensional and flat-panel paintings of artist Dennis Ruble involve a complex interplay of hard edged line and free form shapes highlighted with vivid color. View this artist’s portfolio by visiting his website.

 

“Victim of the System” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 71” x 63” x 6” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Victim of the System” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 71” x 63” x 6”

 

As an artist, I’m not only driven to create because I want to, but because I have to. Since early childhood I’ve had pencil in hand, drawing everything I felt passionate about. As time passed, I realized there were no boundaries, borders or limitations to my creative pursuits.

 

“Cosmicon II” Diptych, Enamel on Wood Panels, 86” x 23” x 2.75” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Cosmicon II” Diptych, Enamel on Wood Panels, 86” x 23” x 2.75”

 

My current body of dimensional and flat-panel paintings explores the contrast of hard-edged graphic lines and shapes against free-form abstract elements. The shadows projected on the wall become an essential part of the piece.

 

 “Restless” Enamel on Wood, Foam and Aluminum, 50” x 47.5” x 11” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Restless” Enamel on Wood, Foam and Aluminum, 50” x 47.5” x 11”

 

The color palette is intense and explosive, and the overall compositional complexity varies depending on the quantity and layers of projecting shapes.

 

“Spare Parts” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 54” x 47” x 5.5” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Spare Parts” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 54” x 47” x 5.5”

 

The wood, aluminum and hi-density foam materials I use in my work allow the necessary design flexibility without weight or structural limitations, regardless of size. The oil-based industrial enamel paint used reflects on my past as a sign painter, and offers the color intensity and variation I desire.

 

Artist Dennis Ruble at work in his studio. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

Artist Dennis Ruble at work in his studio

 

My creative process involves sketching loose concepts, building a pile of 3D elements, making some organizational sense of the chaos, deconstructing and painting, and re-assembling and tweaking into the final version that takes control of the wall it occupies.

 

“West to East” Triptych, Enamel on Wood and Foam, 102” x 64” x 5.5” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“West to East” Triptych, Enamel on Wood and Foam, 102” x 64” x 5.5”

 

The motivation for my work comes from things as simple as stimulating places I’ve visited, to special events, architectural elements, or mechanical objects experienced in the intense cycle of everyday life. Subconscious intrusions, of course, are always stimulating factors.

 

“In a Good Place #2” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 66” x 48” x 3.5” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“In a Good Place #2” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 66” x 48” x 3.5”

 

My Environmental Distortion Series, for example, investigates implied abstract landscapes and distorted architectural patterns as if experienced in a dream state with the typical complexity and confusion.

 

“Spy vs. Spy” Enamel on Wood Panel, 54.5” x 42” x 3” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Spy vs. Spy” Enamel on Wood Panel, 54.5” x 42” x 3”

 

My Architectural Pop Series explores linear geometry with random atmospheric interruptions mingling throughout the geometric perspectives as if they have taken control of the architectural space.

 

“Horizontal Hold” Triptych, Enamel, Plastic and Walnut on Wood, 70” x 22” x 3” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Horizontal Hold” Triptych, Enamel, Plastic and Walnut on Wood, 70” x 22” x 3”

 

Random Acts Series, my newest work, is significantly more open. It challenged me to be more receptive to what happens when you allow the work to take you where IT wants to go instead of carefully manipulating it to be consistent. This is a liberating concept, for sure.

 

“Alternative Architecture” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 71” x 63” x 6” by artist Dennis Ruble. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Alternative Architecture” Enamel on Wood and Foam, 71” x 63” x 6”

 

In many areas of my work, the process is as important to me as the final product. The exercise of uncovering a creative direction is an exhilarating experience. It’s imperative to know good work and to perfect technique, but ultimately, the creative rush for me is in the challenge of investigating the vision. The biggest payoff of all is the thrill of the risk. When it works, I am in a good place.

 

Artist Dennis Ruble invites you to follow him on Facebook and his Artsletter.

 

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Comments

  1. Fun work; always good to see sign men in the studio and where that experience takes them. I enjoy the “artist at work” images on your website, that one on the ladder is classic!
    Condolences on the passing of your studio buddy, as well as Rosenquist, who really brought sign painting experience (and scale) to the forefront.

    Best wishes and keep up the fun.

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