Featured Artist Alice Shepherd

Intrigued, I bought my first kiln and began my relationship with glass—this unique material that is neither solid nor liquid, whose molecular structure changes with every firing yet retains the details of each, that can be smooth or textured, flat or wavy, woven, draped, that can record images—had captured my fascination!

Featured Artist Vikki Jackson

My goal is to interpreting the amazing flora and fauna of this country (Australia) with my individual style and share it with the rest of the world.

Featured Artist Heidi Hooper

I tried many different media, and after trying various fabrics and paper, and in a move that surprised even me, ended up making art from dryer lint. I liked working with the textures, and had to teach myself the techniques needed to make it look great. As I progressed, my work became increasingly complicated and more detailed.

Featured Artist Gary Bigelow

Stylistically speaking, I believe that my art is ubiquitously enigmatic and, in some numinous way, mirrors what was, and what is, my life.

Featured Artist Christine Kerrick

Most of my forensic art is facial reconstruction from skeletal remains. This makes me see more clearly the transitory nature of our bodies and lives and makes it all the more important to tell the stories of people in portraits and assemblage.

Featured Artist Milla Malchow

I love the technique of free motion threading, it is like using thread as a paintbrush—combining my love of both painting and quilting.

Featured Artist Olivia Alexander

Single pigmented paints, many of which are transparent in nature, are among my favourites. Layer upon layer is built on the canvas, combined with inks and watercolours. The transparency allows each layer to peek through to the one above.

Featured Artist Flip Solomon

My circadian rhythms were off and I was nocturnal so I started working through the night, invoking nighttime’s mystical energy while simultaneously honoring my own cycles. My excessive REM cycles gave me intense and vivid dreams so I started drawing them.

Featured Artist Mark Witzling

Painting abstractly exposes the artist and embracing this vulnerability requires a leap of faith in self. I think my art journey has made me a stronger human being. One of my personal mottoes has become “strength in humility.”

Featured Artist Joseph Boddy

I feel strongly about honoring the past by reintroducing reclaimed wood from old buildings, rusty farm equipment and other natural materials in a way that hopefully helps redefine what beauty has always been.

Featured Artist Jennifer Yoswa

There is nothing else I’d rather be doing than making art. On any given day, at any given time, I can be found sitting at my easel, listening to music while joyfully losing myself in the process.

Featured Artist Denise Presnell

To add an even more random step to the process, I stand the canvas or paper up vertically and let it drip. The contrast between random accidents and more decisive mark making thrills me.

Featured Artist Jorn Lynae Mork

I try to paint the way a meadowlark sings. Lines become the energetic swirls of wind and a woman may show the strength of a mountain or the resilience of a tree.

Featured Artist Jonna Gill

Two disciplines, photography and painting, come together and remain separate in my most current and continuous projects—La Belle Fleur (one woman’s obsession with flowers) and PROJECT MAX.