Featured Artist Frederic Lecut

Fascinated by the ancient art of mosaic, self-taught artist Frederic Lecut portrays the emotions of his subjects by focusing on their eyes. Learn more about this artist and his passion by visiting his website.

 

“Afghan Girl” Granite, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 36” x 14” “Afghan Girl” Granite, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 36” x 14”

“Afghan Girl” Granite, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 36” x 14”

 

I was born in Abbeville, a small town in northern France in July, 1957. At a young age, I was looking for artifacts left by men of past times and visiting museum and archaeological digs. I was particularly fond of Roman sites decorated with wonderful mosaics.

 

“Miriam’s Eyes” Granite, Travertine, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 39” x 21” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Miriam’s Eyes” Granite, Travertine, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 39” x 21”

 

I studied mechanical and nuclear engineering, served my military time abroad and pursued an international career working for several organizations and companies.

 

“Blue Carole” Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board , 49” x 18” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Blue Carole” Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board , 49” x 18”

 

In 2001, I abandoned the corporate world to dedicate myself to my two passions—martial and visual arts. In Provence in 2003, I met a mosaicist whose gorgeous creations reminded me of Roman frescoes and mosaics, and I decided to try this myself. When I returned to the United States, I purchased some tools and went to work.

 

“Carole’s Eyes” Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 47” x 17” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Carole’s Eyes” Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 47” x 17”

 

My technique is influenced both by the past mosaics of the Roman Empire and by futuristic 21st century digital technologies.

 

Artist Frederic Lecut at work in his studio. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

Artist Frederic Lecut at work in his studio

 

I am basically self-taught. Mosaics are a very technical and challenging medium. I read a few books and tried to understand how mosaics were created. With relatively primitive tools, Roman and Byzantine craftsmen and artists created wonders. I spent lots of time and energy traveling to study their work and experimenting in my studio figuring out their techniques to use them in my creations.

 

“Maribel’s Eyes” Granite, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board , 51” x 14” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Maribel’s Eyes” Granite, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board , 51” x 14”

 

I also believe that using words or repeating methods executed in the past brings us in communion with our ancestors. Even when I am in Alabama, as I am using the tools Roman mosaicists used to mount the floors of Pompeii, I feel that I am in tune with them. I think and feel like they did when they were at work. I hope this communion beyond time and space allows me to tap into their psyche to create pieces that will fill my patrons with awe, like the ancient mosaics still do for us.

 

“Yezidi Boy’s Eyes” Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 50” x 18” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Yezidi Boy’s Eyes” Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 50” x 18”

 

At the same time, I am also fascinated by 21st century digital technology and the concept of open source. I constantly experiment to develop new techniques that will allow the creation of new kinds of art and styles never seen before.

 

“Yezidi Female Fighter” Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board , 50” x 18” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Yezidi Female Fighter” Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board , 50” x 18”

 

In 2015, I came up with a unique technique that allows the mosaicist to create different mosaic variations of the same theme or model. In its principle, Opus Pixellatum is similar to sheet music that allows the accomplished musician to interpret a theme in different styles.

 

“Black and White Veil” Granite, Slate, Travertine and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 35” x 28” by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Black and White Veil” Granite, Slate, Travertine and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 35” x 28”

 

In 2016, I started to create mosaics using both ancient and modern techniques in many different ways. The results are amazing. Because the possible variations are inexhaustible, I also share some of these techniques with other craftsmen and artists so they too can experiment with them.

The eyes are the mirror of the soul.

 

“Sean Connery’s Eyes” Granite, Travertine, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 49” x 14”by artist Frederic Lecut. See his portfolio by visiting www.ArtsyShark.com

“Sean Connery’s Eyes” Granite, Travertine, Marble, Ceramic and Glass on Wood Framed Cement Board, 49” x 14”

 

I believe art should generate strong, positive emotions in the mind and heart of the beholder. Most of my work is about the eyes of real people. I portray the eyes of celebrities, of Afghan and Syrian refugees and of other people. I try to convey their feelings, emotions and experiences. I strive to portray the soul behind the eyes. My first portraits were accurate and realistic representations of those eyes. In 2017, I started to incorporate additional elements to my compositions to reinforce the emotional aspect of my eyes portraits.

 

Artist Frederic Lecut invites you to follow him on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and his Blog.

 

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YES PLEASE!

Comments

  1. Wonderful work. Frederic Lecut takes an ancient technique and makes art that is relevant in a full range of styles. ‘Blue Carole’ is modern and playful. ‘Black and White Veil’ is riveting. I’m officially inspired and will get back in my shop!

  2. Thank you Shannon. I am trying to ally ancient and modern designs. I spend lots of time studying roman mosaics, documenting their design and I will begin incorporating some of them into my own creation this year.
    By the way I just visited your site, I have been very interested by glass for quite a while. I have been wondering if it is possible to create some sort of glass jewelry by making a mosaic and then fusing the glass, as a sort of millefiori. I once saw a video about this, they were using a torch. but there must be a lot more to it than what they showed. Maybe we could discuss this by email or otherwise.

  3. Your wonderful mosaics are a great inspiration for me. I too am a self taught mosaic artist. It is a wonderful art form, though requires a passion for detail and a lot of time. I currently use a less traditional style, using nippers and a grinder for shaping my tesserae. I am still in the process of finding my unique style. Do you find only doing eyes keeps you interested in process? Would you say that it is important to develop a specific recognizable style. If so why?

    • actually, I mostly like doing eyes and trees Meredith.
      I have been doing mostly eyes lately because they get people’s attention. So I do eyes of refugees and minority children and women to bring awareness of their dire situation. I am not an activist, but if my art can help, it is better.
      As for developing some kind of unicity, yes, it is important. There are thousands of great mosaicists out there. You want to be known as the guy who makes mosaic eyes, or the girl who makes blue tree mosaics… Do something specific, then you stand out and people identify you.
      Which does not mean you have to get stuck with this. you style or image can evolve, but the more unique you are the better I believe.

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